About this Show

ABC World News With Diane Sawyer

News/Business. Diane Sawyer. (2012) New. (CC)

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ABC

DURATION
00:30:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
Annapolis, MD, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 78 (549 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

America 13, Abc 10, U.s. 6, United States 5, Apple 4, Diane 4, China 4, Washington 4, Syria 3, Humana 3, Unitedhealthcare 2, Astrazeneca 2, Jonathan Karl 2, Tom Coburn 2, Coburn 2, Clinton 2, Assad 2, Sharyn Alfonsi 2, David Wright 2, Nick Schifrin 2,
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  ABC    ABC World News With Diane Sawyer    News/Business. Diane  
   Sawyer.  (2012) New. (CC)  

    December 6, 2012
    6:30 - 7:00pm EST  

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this is "world news." tonight, dangerous weapons. the u.s. warns the strongman of syria not to use the chemical weapons he has loaded, ready to go at an airfield. so, what will the u.s. do next? made in america claims a kind of victory. apple announcing they will bring some jobs back from overseas. but is this the start of something even bigger? hooked. the mom spending up to $200 a month of her virtual farm. and we'll show you other games which keep you coming back with a secret every six seconds. and, the perfect gift made so easy. do you want to create this look under the christmas tree? >> oh, my god! >> scientists tonight give you the simple, amazing way to do it
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every time. good evening. we begin with the worldwide reaction today to a dangerous move in syria. chemicals, dead lly gas loaded onto weapons near an airfield there. one drop could kill within minutes. so, world leaders are mobilizing tonight, deciding what they're going to do. and abc's senior foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz takes us inside that story. >> reporter: today, hillary clinton, overseas, trying to tind some dip mroep matic way to end this increasingly dangerous conflict. 20 months of fighting, 40,000 lives lost. and now the chilling possibility of an air attack with deadly nerve agents. >> there is no question that we remain very concerned that the regime might very well
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consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: a senior u.s. official saying that over the weekend, the syrian military loaded components of the nerve gas sarin into bombs on or near syrian airfields. they have not loaded the bombs onto aircraft, but the threat remains. >> once these chemicals are poured into weapons, artillery shells, bombs that can be dropped from airplanes, they can be good up to almost two months. >> reporter: the syrian government claims it will not use chemical weapons. but president assad is feeling the pressure from opposition forces who have gained strength and are now moving on the capital, damascus. jeremy bowen, with our bbc partners, is there tonight and reports assad's forces are waging a fierce defense. >> throughout the day and after dark, when i'm speaking to you, there are quite steady explosions of shell fire, outgoing artillery fire, going into the suburbs around the center of the city, where i am.
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>> reporter: residents are caught in a worsening cross fire. >> people who came from areas that are being shelled, they are on the streets, many children, sometimes you see them crying, old people are sleeping on the ground. >> reporter: but nothing is this horrific war has gotten the attention of u.s. officials more than this chemical weapons threat. >> these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction in syria. this may be the last warning we get. >> reporter: i can tell you planning for all sorts of con tin jen sips is already well under way. but military action would not be easy. it could take upwards of 75,000 troops to secure those chemical weapons, which no one is eager to provide. but president obama, diane, has warned that using those weapons is a red line. >> on the story for us tonight, martha raddatz, thank you, martha. and now, we want to tell you
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about another turbulent hot spot, so vital to the united states. there is a battle in the streets outside the presidential palace in egypt, again. and abc's nick schifrin is there. >> reporter: tonight, 10,000 egyptians taking the fight over their future to the presidential palace. they want president mohamed morsi, the man they elected, now to be removed for seizing too much power. last night, the same street was a war zone. six killed, 700 injured. the biggest crisis here since egypt, one of america's most important arab allies, overthrew its dictator, hosni mubarak. these very same people filled these same streets two years ago. today, they are chanting the exact same songs, only replacing mubarak's name with morsi's. tonight, morsi refused to give up the absolute power he seized to write a new constitution. one that many here feel doesn't protect the rights and freedoms they fought so hard for. >> he has become like using --
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you didn't like mubarak, it is worse than mubarak. >> reporter: the president's defiance has only increased the tension here. and tonight, these people vow to fight on in the name of democracy. diane? >> nick schifrin in cairo tonight. and now, we return back here at home, to made in america, claiming a kind of victory tonight. the american powerhouse, apple, famous for its giant manufacturing operations in china, has promised to do something they have not done in nearly 20 years. build some apple computers right here in the united states. and abc's david muir, captain of our made in america team, is here with the latest. >> reporter: diane, as you know, for nearly three decades, apple made its computers in the u.s. tonight, word one of those lines will bear those three words we've been talking so much about here. made in america. tonight, that bold announcement from apple. ceo tim cook now says some of apple's mac computers will never
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year carry those three words, made in america. cook telling bloomberg business week that the company plans to spend 1$100 millioner in year t move production from the mac line from china back here to the u.s. it was this year, when asked about the factories they used to have here in america that tim cook talked about the possibility of bringing manufacturing back. >> there is some manufacturing revival in the u.s. will there be an apple product ever made again in the united states? >> i want there to be. >> reporter: and now a promise that there will be. the vast majority of apple products are made overseas. >> wow. >> reporter: the factories in china made 40% of the world's electronics. where just this year, abc's bill weir took you inside for an exclusive look, after working conditions there came under fire. this new move by apple, moving their line of macs back to america, still represents a small percentage of apple's overyou a product line. iphones, ipads still assembled overseas. but cook has made the point before that key components for
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the iphone are made in america. the processor, the glass in kentucky. >> will it ever say on the back of a product, made in the united states? >> several parts are from the united states. >> reporter: apple is now joining a trend that we reported on extensively here on "world news." an early wave of american wo companies rethinking where they make their products. chinese wages have come back. and another reason to come back, location. make it here and you don't have to ship from china, saving a lot of money. suddenly, the math isn't adding up. so, they are decides that made in america makes more sense. >> yes, it's an economic question about being made in america. it's not necessarily a patriotic question. it's an economic question. >> reporter: one that also creates a ripple effect here at home. the other jobs created. just last night, we introduced you to arianna russell in st. louis, making her own iphone cases and determined to make her
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design here in america. so, you found a way to do it here. >> i found a way to do it here. >> reporter: there was so much interest in those cases last night that her website crashed within five minutes of our report. but it's back up and running tonight and she tells us she sold 2,000 of the cases in 24 hours. on this larger announce m from apple tonight, we reached out to our team of economists and they all echoed one another, saying this is about more than just good will. it's now good business. and this move puts an exclamation point on the trend we've all been reporting here. >> american jobs, back on the case again tonight. thank you, david. and now, we head out west to washington state, where something brand new in america happened today. and for the first time ever, marijuana is legal in one state. so, what does this mean for other states in the country, and perhaps your family? here's abc's neal karlinsky. >> three, two, one! >> reporter: at 12:01 this morning, under the cover of the
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space needle, seattle lit up. >> well, i think it's great we finally get to that point, you know what i mean? why hide it? >> reporter: in washington state, it's now totally legal to smoke marijuana for pleasure, as long as you're at least 21. i'm over 21. >> sure. >> reporter: i pull out an ounce of maifrp right now, you are a sworn officer. what will you say to me? >> i'm going to say probably nothing. >> reporter: in fact, they joke on the official police website, "you may responsibly get baked, order some pizzas and enjoy a 'lord of the rings' marathon in the privacy of your own home." but even though it's legal to have it, it's not yet legal to sell marijuana to the masses. at least not for another year, while the state establishes rules for this now budding industry. entrepreneurs, or "pot-trepeneurs," like this former microsoft manager are already making plans to open st starbucks-like stores. you've got this displayed, you know, encased like a beautiful piece of art. you're targeting the high-end
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market? >> that is exactly right. the category of premium marijuana. think like a fine brandy, a fine cognac. >> reporter: drug policy experts worry the new law could spark new problems. >> the price of marijuana will drop dramatically and consumption will increase. that spells bad news for parents and researchers who are realizing that today's maifrn is not your woodstock weed of the '60s. it is much more harmful. >> reporter: state officials estimate this once-taboo plant will eventually bring in $500 million in tax revenue per year. enough to cover the seattle police department's entire budget. it becomes legal in colorado next month, and experts say three states, oregon, california and massachusetts, are also watching closely. just to give you a sense of what the stores might look like, this is a medical maifrn dispenry. soon, you may see marijuana with prices and labels just like, this in totally legal stores, at strip malls. diane? >> thank you, name. and now, we head to washington and a big shock today about one of the most powerful
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forces in the tea party. republican senator jim demint of south carolina, the unwaivering godfather of the movement, announced he is leaving the government. he says he thinks he can be effective at head of the conservative research group, the heritage foundation. and, as one powerful senator exits the stage, another sounds an alarm tonight about the waste of taxpayer dollars. republican senator tom coburn triggers of washington watchdog report and abc's jonathan karl . >> reporter: the zombie apocalypse. this isn't some really bad b-movie. it's an actual scene from the 2012 counterterrorism summit attended by law enforcement officials around the country. summit tickets, $1,000 a pop, paid for with your tax dollars. the zombies look scary, but organizers say the skit was solely to add levity to an otherwise serious meeting on protecting the homeland.
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senator tom coburn says it's an exhibit in $7 billion in questionable homeland security spending every year. >> wasteful. >> reporter: in a new report, coburn sites example after example, including nearly $0,000 for an underwater robot in columbus, ohio. $69,000 hovercraft for indianapolis. and this. a sleepy town of keene, new hampshire, siting the need to secure its annual pumpkin festival, was awarded a grant to buy a bearcat armored vehicle. price tag? nearly a quarter of a million dollars. department of homeland security told us its grants, quote, make our communities safer places to live. coburn says there's just too much waste. the examples you site here are the tip of the iceberg? >> sure. all over the government. everywhere you look. >> reporter: is what? >> is waste. incompetence and stupidity. >> reporter: but again, could you ever be too prepared for the
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zombie apocalypse? jonathan karl, abc news, capitol hill. and, still ahead on "world news," we're going to show you what's happening every six seconds in some video games that could get you hooked and cost you big money. next.
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i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathing. today, we're ready for whatever swims our way. ask your doctor about symbicort. i got my first prescription free. call or click to learn more. [ male announcer ] if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. and now, we have a report on a secret in your neighborhood,
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and not among teenage kids. but moms, dads, grownups, spending a fortune on something they're finding hard to stop. abc's david wright investigates why we're getting hooked by online games. and it's not an accident. >> reporter: if you've ever played angry birds or words with friends, or farmville, you might have some sympathy for diann edwards of red lion, pennsylvania. she plays games on her laptop eight hours a day. >> it just gets addicting. i don't know why. what am i doing spending all this time playing a game? >> reporter: she spends $200 a month on her farmville habit. she can't help it. she's hooked. dr. timothy fong of ucla says he sees patients just like her every day. >> the average age of our patient is about 40. we've seen housewives, we've seen doctors, we've seen lawyers. the stereotype of the video game addict is a teenage kid in his underwear. that's not what's happening out there. >> reporter: the american
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psychological association has so far declined to recognize video game addiction as a diagnosis. but the apa lists video game psychologist as a hot career, because the gaming industry is highing psychologists as consultants to make their games more inticing. ariella leher, a trained psychologist designs games for middle aged women. >> our most popular title is called "murder she wrote." >> reporter: the content romance and mystery. but the psychology pure las vegas. >> i think there's a lot to learn from las vegas. >> reporter: for instance intermittent rewards. >> the rewards, the money in the cash drawer, don't come ever single time. we learned this with rats. with food pedal press. >> reporter: some games follow a six second rule. every six seconds a visual sparkle to entice you to keep playing. >> potency, if you will, of these video games is much, much more intense, more rewarding, more engaging than video games
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were 30 years ago. >> reporter: which makes them a lot more fun unless -- >> do you want 60, 100, 500? >> reporter: -- you get hooked. david wright, a b kr nbc news, angeles. and coming up next, a rematch between clinton and obama. but not what you think. coming up next. [ female announcer ] the humana walmart-preferred rx plan p-d-p
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her side, as her father-in-law, prince charles, with the roil accent, send his congratulations. thank you. >> very nice thought of grandfatherhood in my old age, if i may say so. i'm very glad she's feeling better. thank goodness. thank you very much. >> and also tonight, what about a clinton/obama rematch. not what you think. president bill clinton versus first lady michelle obama. both nominated for best spoken word album at this year's grammys. so, choose for yourself. here's mrs. obama's childhood memory, from her book about the white house garden. >> our apartment didn't have a dining room. so, we ate at the kitchen table. and unless my dad was working the evening shift at his job at the city water plant, we ate our meals together, as a family. >> and her opponent, president clinton, reading his book, "back to work." >> i earned my first money
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mowing lawns when i was 12. at 13, i worked at a small grocery store. >> so, it is game on for the two of them. and speaking of game on, basketball powerhouse kobe bryant, way to go. the youngest player ever to reach a milestone and watch. it's his 30,000th point. joining the ranks of michael jordan, kareem abdul-jabbar. kobe has now spent half his life playing in the nba and we decided to go back and find his first point ever. there it was, a free throw. he was 18 years old, bookends for a truly amazing athlete. and, be sure to tweet me your thoughts for the "instant index," @dianesawyer. and coming up, want to give the perfect gift? scientists have finally found the secret. and it's easy. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health
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so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathing. today, we're ready for whatever swims our way. ask your doctor about symbicort. i got my first prescription free. call or click to learn more. [ male announcer ] if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help.
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and now, science has finally tackled something and conquered it. something truly important. as millions of americans pace the aisles in search for the holiday gift that will bring a smile to family and friends. there is a new scientific study that says that there is a simple and inspired secret. and abc's sharyn alfonsi is here to make all of our lives easier. >> reporter: they are the moments parents pray for. >> oh my god! >> an ipod. >> reporter: those priceless reactions to the perfect gift. james groccia had his eye on the lego train set of his dreams. for two years, he saved up $100 to buy it. but by the time he had the money, the set was sold out. heartbroken, james wrote a letter to lego and then --
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>> what is it? >> i wonder what it is. >> reporter: this arrived from lego. >> i finally have it! >> reporter: youtube is filmed with similar moments. >> we're leaving today to go to disneyland. >> are you joking? >> really dad? >> yes, we're going. >> reporter: daughter learning she's headed to disneyland. the mother learning she's about to become a grandmother. >> it's a baby! >> reporter: turning out, there is a science to getting those priceless reactions. one study found, pricier gifts don't translate into greater appreciation. exhibit one, the kitten. >> oh my god! >> reporter: the key, studies show, is getting into the head of the recipient. and in the head of a kid, this electric guitar is a good idea. experts say you should give the recipient exactly what they say they want, not what you think
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they should want. >> what the heck is that? that's not toys, that's books! >> reporter: in other words, stick to the list. and reap the rewards. sharyn alfonsi, abc news, new york. >> and thank you for watching. "nightline" will be along later. we leave you tonight with the national christmas tree. 28 feet tall, the lights just switched on. good night. /jok;v <o
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